Lee Brooker - LIFE FOR POT

Lee Brooker is serving a LIFE sentence for cannabis.

LEE CARROLL BROOKER # 00296774

I believe Mr. Brooker is out on HOUSTON MEDICAL FURLOUGH.

LEE CARROLL BROOKER 
REGISTER NUMBER: 00296774
DOB: 1939
RACE: WHITE
SEX: MALE
LOCATED AT: HOLMAN CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
RELEASE DATE: 999 YEARS 99 MONTHS 99 DAYS

OFFENSE: TRAF CANNABIS 2.2 - 100 LBS
SENTENCED DATE: 10/3/2014

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A 75-Year-Old Disabled Man Was Sentenced to Life in Prison for Growing Weed for Personal Use 

SUPREME COURT AGREES TO RECONSIDER LIFE SENTENCE FOR POT GROWER

The New York Times editorial board weighed in Thursday on what they called the “outrageous” sentenced handed down to Lee Carroll Brooker, a 75-year-old disabled veteran in Alabama who is serving a life sentence for growing marijuana. The NYT called on the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn Brooker’s sentence, saying it’s the embodiment of cruel and unusual punishment.

Brooker was convicted of drug trafficking in 2014, after police in Dothan, Alabama raided his son’s home in 2011; his son, Darren Lee Brooker, was also charged. The police described what they found as a “growing operation” in a wooded area behind the house, saying they seized 42 plants with a “street value” of $92,000.

Darren was eventually sentenced to five years’ probation, with a suspended five-year prison sentence that will be dismissed if he doesn’t violate any of his terms. But his father had four previous felony convictions from decades ago, including armed robbery, for which he served time. Alabama law mandates that anyone with prior felonies get an automatic life sentence for possessing more than about two pounds of weed.

Brooker’s sentence, Moore wrote, in a special 2015 memo, is “excessive and unjustified,” and showed a need for a change in the state’s drug laws: “A trial court should have the discretion to impose a less severe sentence than life imprisonment without the possibility of parole.”

Brooker is appealing his sentence, on the grounds that it violates his Eighth Amendment rights to be free of cruel and unusual punishment. On Friday, the Supreme Court is expected to decide whether to hear Brooker’s case. The Times weighed in unambiguously, calling on the court to overturn the sentence, adding that mandatory life sentences—especially for nonviolent crimes—don’t seem like the best idea:

Life without parole, second only to the death penalty in severity, should never be a mandatory sentence for any crime, much less for simple possession of marijuana, which is not even a crime in many parts of the country. If this punishment is ever meted out, it should be by a judge who has carefully weighed the individual circumstances of a case.

 

 

 


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